Spot the Replica

by Jessica on December 9, 2011

Time to play Spot the Replica. Admittedly, this won’t be much of a challenge, but maybe you’ve had a long day and need a little boost to your ego. I’m here to help.

The Eiffel Tower

The one on the right is icon of the city of Paris, France.The giant red chapeau on the one on the left is the tipoff that it is a replica in the city of Paris, Texas.If you are planning to check out one of these metal structures, you’ll probably want to go with the one in France.It’s bigger and shinier and surrounded by things like Notre Dame and the Louvre.The replica is surrounded by pretty much nothing.You can do a little climbing on the replica, however, and if your kids are big Phineus and Ferb fans that might trump anything that France has to offer.

 

The Leaning Tower of Pisa

The world famous leaning tower that is the centerpiece of the Italian city of Pisa is pictured on the left.The tower on the right is also leaning, it just happens to belong to the city of Niles, Illinois, making it the Leaning Tower of….well, Niles.For extra bonus points, you should know that the Tower of Niles is roughly half the size of the original Pisa model and was built as an attractive way to house the water needed for the city’s recreational pools.Think of the original as an ode to poor engineering and the replica as a nod to plain old practicality wrapped up in a pretty package.

Parthenon

It’s hard to miss the Parthenon, and not just because it is perched high on a hill.The real Parthenon (on the left) has scaffolding and other construction accoutrements around it all the time. While I recognize that restoration is necessary for this great Greek structure to be preserved for future generations, it’s quite the rub when you fly half way across the world and want to get a decent picture. Perfect pictures are free for the clicking at the Parthenon replica in Nashville, Tennessee, where there is nary a ladder in sight. Though, the replica seems to be missing that “I survived the golden age of Greece and only lost a few of my marbles to that Elgin guy” vibe.

Stonehenge

If the ancient stones on the left aren’t a big enough tipoff, the fog that seems to perpetually cloak the surrounding English countryside might do it. Stonehenge II is approximately 60% of the size of the original and rarely sees a foggy day in Ingram, Texas just outside of San Antonio.You can actually walk around the stones of the replica, which is a big no-no at the original site.The English Stonehenge is built of giant monolithic stones constructed by ancient Druids (or aliens, depending on your world view). Stonehenge II boasts a lighter, more streamlined plaster and mesh frame and was constructed by two guys who were inspired by the leftover materials of a backyard patio remodel.  Inspiration comes in all forms.

Moai of Rapa Nui

They might sound like characters from a Dr. Seuss book, but they are better known as the giant statues of Easter Island.The one on the left could looks like an original, and if it wasn’t for the giant hole in the fiberglass back of the figure, it might be more convincing. It stands in the field in Ingram, Texas along with Stonehenge II. The moai on the right resides at the British Museum in London .In either location, these guys with the giant facial features will always and forever be associated as the “Dum, dum me want gum, gum” guys from Night at the Museum and illicit peals of laughter from kids 13 and under. 

 

~This post is a part of Photo Friday at Delicious Baby~

{ 5 comments }

Steve December 9, 2011 at 12:07 pm

Is it bad if I didn't score 100% on this quiz? Love the water tower – that was a great idea!

Sonja December 9, 2011 at 2:07 pm

Hilarious, clever post.  Thanks for bringing me a big smile this morning.

Tracy December 9, 2011 at 2:25 pm

Thanks for the laugh! I'll admit I got the last one wrong.

Sophie December 9, 2011 at 4:35 pm

Too funny :) What is it with Texas…

Lisa December 9, 2011 at 5:22 pm

I got the last one wrong too – though the real deal was the outdoor one!  Great post!

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